Virginia Governor's Mansion, Richmond, VA.
Virginia Dept. of Historic Resources
narrative / family

The Forced Absence of Slavery: Rare Letters to a Virginia Governor

Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe is taking steps to commemorate enslaved people who worked for his predecessor nearly 200 years ago.
Hannah Valentine was 300 miles away from her family in 1838 when she wrote to say how much she missed them.
“My dear husband I begin to feel so anxious to hear from you and my children,” she wrote.

This wasn’t just any separation; this was the forced absence of slavery. Hannah Valentine had been left behind in Abingdon while her husband, Micheal, and others went to Richmond with the Campbells, the white family who owned them.

David Campbell had been elected governor of Virginia. For three years, Michael Valentine and several of his children lived and worked for Campbell at the Executive Mansion, which stands today as the oldest continuously used governor’s residence in the country.

While all of the men who have spent a term as governor in that house are meticulously remembered in the history-obsessed state, the black families who served them — who actually helped build the house in 1813 — are largely forgotten. Every new governor brought his own staff, and they were anonymous property. Even the furniture is better recorded.
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