History in the Face of Catastrophe

After my son died, how could I know anything for certain?
Duel between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton from

Again with the History

Were the founders really warning us about Trump, or were they just playing politics, too?
President Donald Trump waves after speaking following a tour of the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum on December 9, 2017 in Jackson, Mississippi.

On Eve of Trump Visit, Mississippi African Americans Say He’s Brought Back Past Troubles

The president’s decision to attend the opening of a new civil rights museum in Jackson has sparked protests.
Frank Campbell was sold by Georgetown University to a plantation in Louisiana along with 271 other enslaved African Americans (ca. 1900).

Slavery and the American University

Determined researchers are finally drawing the lines between higher education and America's original sin.
Albert Bierstadt's

From Yosemite to Bears Ears, Erasing Native Americans From U.S. National Parks

150 years after Yosemite opened to the public, the park's indigenous inhabitants are still struggling for recognition.

Teaching Hard History

A new study suggests that high school students lack a basic knowledge of the role slavery played in shaping the United States.
The controversial statue of John C. Calhoun stands in Marion Park in downtown Charleston, SC.

Black Charleston and the Battle Over Confederate Statues

The debate over a Charleston monument to John Calhoun exemplifies the problems of contextualizing Confederate monuments.

Everyone Was Wrong About the Real 'Rosie the Riveter’ for Decades

Here's how the mystery of her true identity was solved.
A re-enactment of the Battle of Appomattox Court House on April 9, 2015 in Appomattox, Virginia.

Inside the Weird World of Historical Re-enactors

From Civil War uniforms to Viking smelts, meet the people who bring history to life.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speaks to reporters during a march en route to Jackson, Mississippi, June 11, 1966.

Restoring King

There is no figure in recent American history whose memory is more distorted than Martin Luther King Jr.

50 Years Later, It Feels Familiar: How America Fractured in 1968

Imagining what the year would have looked like in mobile push-alerts.
Martin Luther King, Jr. speaks at a New York City press conference for Clergy & Laymen Concerned About Vietnam, January 12, 1968. He announced the Poor People's March on Washington at this event.

Martin Luther King Jr. Spent the Last Year of His Life Detested by the Liberal Establishment

King was roundly denounced for his stances against the Vietnam War and injustices north of the Mason-Dixon line.